Wheels for rough pavement

I skated in the mid 90s. Got my first board since 1998 the other day. It's a Santa Cruz popsicle 8. I love it for doing tricks but it's terrible for riding around the hood, mainly due to all the rough old pavement. So I decided to get an old school board just for cruising and ollieing up curbs when necessary. Need recommendations for wheels. Never actually owned an old school deck. Wanted the Mike McGill Powell Peralta for my 8th birthday in 1988, literally had it in my hands at the skate shop, but dad refused to buy it for me due to the $130 price tag. Soooo I never had much experience with those 80s decks and need wheel/durometer recs. All help is greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • Bones Rough Riders are the best cruiser wheels available in my opinion, lots of color choices, get the 59mm and you will fly through your rough neighborhood....
  • Hey thanks for your comment ovaldragon. Any advantages to 60mm or bigger wheels? Just wondering as I'm putting together this complete. Some sites auto-advise 60mm and up.
  • I agree the 59mm Rough Riders are great for cruising around my neighborhood. They do 'ride' harder than I expected. But, they get up to speed FAST and are still soft enough to plow over the extra crusty patches. They won't slow roll forever like giant gummy longboard wheels though. If that's what you're look'n for then I'd go that route.
  • @Stripe
    I think that 58mm-60mm size is best for cruising. Anything bigger than 60mm and you have to get giant risers which feel strange to me...
  • edited June 2019
    I like my 56mm g slides as Auckland is super hilly and the slide-ability lets me bleed off speed, even on asphalt surfaces.
  • Bombers are a good all rounder, and come in 60mm/85A.
  • @ghostbuster
    I agree. The 85a formula used in bombers and black rat bones is one of my favorites. Slides like butter and durable!
  • Bombers do roll well over rough terrain, but I have had them kill cheap bearings like Bones Reds from doing slides. Either get cored wheels, or tougher bearings!
  • The problem I have with cored wheels is the appearance...they usually look like longboard wheels. I wish the g slides and rough riders didn't have such a goofy looking core. I like the "old school" appearance of the bombers and rat bones, but I too have had bearings ruined on the 85a coreless wheels.
  • would spacers help when sliding?
  • Spacers aren’t the issue because I use them @Wheelbyte . Spacers butt up against the bit of the bearing that makes contact with the truck axle. Since a non-cored 85a wheel can flex quite dramatically, the top of the bearing can be laterally pushed, in the same direction as the axis of the truck axle, thus damaging a cheap bearing.
  • Thanks Wakey.
    So I recently saw that manic last pootube from rat vision that hard sold 'angst' bearings. Are there bearings with superior lateral strength for sliding and slalom?
  • A quick way to determine if a wheel is suitable for rough-riding is by looking at its diameter and durometer rating. Wheels with a bigger diameter, specifically within 54mm and 60mm, and rank softer, 78a-88a, on the durometer scale are highly recommended for skating through irregular terrain.
  • shark wheels GET RESPECT jk but srsly shark wheels are nice
  • Hey Stripe, im old school skater as well (started skating in the 80s) ok, bare with me, right now im ridding 3 setups, all with different wheels; I got a 8.5 flight with P5, SPF 56mm 84b clears (p.s. Powell please bring these back) which is great for bowls or wood vert but as I live in PDX and our streets suck so for bombing to the park they are no good; My 2nd setup, a CalSK8 8.5 with SSF, 56mm, 85a which are great for bombing and the park/vert only downside they are wider than the p5cuts and they tend to stick to rougher concrete bowls in my experience which is good and bad depending on how you ride. My third is a Vision psycho stick 10.0 with Blur 95a /60mm, but its a little slow on the street and the park, So im thinking about switching them out ATF 59's for bombing around, not sure how they will work in the park or vert though as they are 40mm wide.

    So, in conclusion, unless you want multiple setups im a fan of 56mm's for size all around, and harder good surfaces (wood/smooth parks) and softer for bombing around.

    The SSFs I found are a good for a combination of ridding styles and surfaces both street and park but they are wider than P5's so if your accustom to a thinner wheel grinds may be weird at first
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